Malaysia Airlines mocked for bucket-list challenge

Marketing gaffe: Malaysia Airlines has rebranded its bucket-list competition.
Marketing gaffe: Malaysia Airlines has rebranded its bucket-list competition. Photo: Reuters

Malaysia Airlines has provoked a storm of controversy by asking customers to list the things they would most like to do before they die.

The airline, which lost two planes this year in disasters that claimed 537 lives, committed the marketing gaffe when it launched a "My Ultimate Bucket List" campaign on Monday.

But with the world still reeling from the twin catastrophes of the MH370 and MH17 crashes, social media users swiftly began mocking the marketing ploy.

The campaign called on Australian and New Zealand residents to write their own bucket list and enter it into a competition to win flights to Malaysia and iPads.

It has since been rebranded around "your ultimate to-do list". 

"The competition had earlier been approved as it was themed around a common phrase that is used in both countries," the airline said in a statement.

"The airline appreciates and respects the sentiments of the public and in no way did it intend to offend any parties."

 All that remains of the "My Ultimate Bucket List Campaign" is a PDF of terms and conditions, accessible here.

Often associated with the terminally ill, a "bucket list" refers to the places one wants to visit or the experiences one wishes to have before they die.

I'll tell you what's NOT on my bucket list - flying on Malaysia Airlines.

"Bucket list" is done before death. Malaysia Airlines asked people's 'bucket lists' in ill-advised contest

WOW. Talk about a marketing disaster.

The aftermath of the twin crashes has reportedly crippled the company financially, with plummeting share prices, near-empty flights and the axing of 6000 jobs fuelling speculation that the company is contemplating filing for bankruptcy.

But the airline described bankruptcy talk as "completely false", saying it would "emerge stronger" after privatisation and restructuring. 

The company endured further negative press when an Australian woman alleged she had been sexually assaulted by a Malaysia Airlines chief steward during a flight to France in August. 

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