World's 10 most famous cinemas that are worth a visit

1. SUN PICTURES, BROOME, AUSTRALIA

Other open-air cinemas may be more more luxurious, more scenic or more romantic. But none comes close – in either charm or longevity – to the simple wooden building in the centre of Broome's Chinatown: opened in 1913, and the oldest al fresco cinema in the world. 

It's had its dark times. Some Broome residents are old enough to remember when audiences were segregated – Caucasians in the comfy deck chairs in the centre, Indigenous cinemagoers at the very back or wooden benches on one side, "Asiatics" on the other side. 

The entrance price is still only $17 for first release movies, and you'll never forget it – especially if a plane comes in to land overhead during a performance and you wonder about the special effects. See broomemovies.com.au

2. TLC CHINESE THEATER, LOS ANGELES, THE US

sunapr8trav10 TRAVELLER 10 - 10 CINEMAS YOU SHOULD VISIT ; text by Steve Meacham *** REUSE PERMITTED *** *** EDITORIAL USE ONLY?*** credit:?Shutterstock LOS ANGELES, USA - AUGUST 19, 2017: TLC Chinese Theater's entrance full of tourists in Hollywood. Editorial.

Photo: Shutterstock

Better known as Grauman's Chinese Theater, famous for its historic Hollywood Walk of Fame, 

Sid Grauman opened his new theatre in 1927 with Cecil B. DeMille's epic The King of Kings (the first movie to controversially show an actor playing Jesus Christ). 

It subsequently hosted the Oscars three times, but is now more usually photographed for red carpet premieres of big movies.

In 2013, TLC (the Chinese electronics giant) won the naming rights as the theatre's owners did a deal with IMAX to convert it into one of the largest screens in north America. 

Before you choose your movie, book the 30-minute walking tour in advance. See tclchinesetheatres.com

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3. COLOSSEUM KINO, OSLO, NORWAY

The Colosseum – built in 1921 – is one of the most memorable architectural structures in world cinema. 

Its dome (admittedly virtually at ground level) is roughly the size of the one Michelangelo designed for the St Peter Basilica in Rome.

Like St Peter's, the Colosseum is even more impressive inside. Its sound system – reverberating around the curved lines of the roof – is almost holy. (Foreign movies are shown in their original language, with Norwegian subtitles). See nfkino.no/oslo

4. SCI-FI DINE-IN THEATRE, WALT DISNEY WORLD, FLORIDA, THE US

GJ67K6 Orlando, Florida, USA. January 13th, 2010. The Sci-Fi Dine-In Theater in Disney's Hollywood Studios. Lucy Clark/Alamy Live News sunapr8trav10 TRAVELLER 10 - 10 CINEMAS YOU SHOULD VISIT ; text by Steve Meacham *** ONE TIME USE ONLY *** *** FEE APPLIES *** credit: Alamy

Photo: Alamy

Sure, it's in a theme park, but it's an early example of "retro", designed to feel like an sanitised version of what used to go on in a classic 1950s drive-in.

Though you sit in fibreglass booths which loosely resemble the classic sports cars of almost 60 years ago while supping on hot fudge sundaes, beef and blue cheese salads and sloppy joes) you don't get to see an actual movie.

With around an hour to finish your meal before you have to vacate your table – this is Disney after all! – you'll see film clips of classic '50s films. See disneyworld.disney.go.com

5. RAJMANDIR THEATRE, JAIPUR, INDIA

EAN8TK Raj Mandir Cinema, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India sunapr8trav10 TRAVELLER 10 - 10 CINEMAS YOU SHOULD VISIT ; text by Steve Meacham *** ONE TIME USE ONLY *** *** FEE APPLIES *** credit: Alamy

Photo: Alamy

Wherever you are in India, reserve an afternoon to visit a Bollywood movie. However, if you happen to be in Jaipur – "the Pink City" with Hawa Mahal ("Palace of the Winds"), its jewellery shops and its Rajasthan camel rides – check out Rajmandir.

It calls itself "the pride of Asia", which may, possibly, underrate the Taj Mahal, the Great Wall of China or Angkor Wat et al. 

Built in 1976, the opulent cinema has been described as a giant pink blancmange. Most of the movies are in Hindi, with English subtitles. If you get bored with the movie, admire the giant chandeliers, the floral scents, and imagine the heat outside. See therajmandir.com

6. FOX THEATRE, DETROIT, US

APJCMX Fox Theatre in Detroit sunapr8trav10 TRAVELLER 10 - 10 CINEMAS YOU SHOULD VISIT ; text by Steve Meacham *** ONE TIME USE ONLY *** *** FEE APPLIES *** credit: Alamy

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Initially housing more than 5000 seats, this is the largest surviving American movie palace of the 1920s.  

Opened in 1928, Shirley Temple made personal appearances here as a child before her movies; Elvis was a drawcard around the time of Jailhouse Rock; Sinatra, Sammy Davis jnr and Liza Minelli broadcast one of the first TV spectaculars at the Fox in 1989.

The present auditorium has been much-renovated. Look at "the Moorish arches", the giant chandelier containing 1200 pieces of crystal, and its side walls adorned by "human faces, birds and animals". See theaterdetroit.com

7. ELECTRIC CINEMA, NOTTING HILL, LONDON

There are now two Electric Cinemas in London (the other is in Shoreditch) but this one, on Portobello Road – the famous market street – is the original, founded in 1910. 

The mass murderer, John Christie, was a projectionist here when he lived at nearby 10 Rillington Place, ironically the title of a later movie starring Richard Attenborough as Christie.

With it's heritage-listed facade and proscenium arch, the Electric was reinvented in 2001. Today, there are only 98 leather armchairs in the actual cinema, plus the Electric Brasserie next door and a private members club upstairs. See electriccinema.co.uk

8. CINE DE CHER, SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA

The Cine de Chef has reinvented the "luxury movie theatre and gourmet restaurant" market.

There's just 30 seats. But for about $130 a ticket (check current prices) you will get valet parking, an escort to your seat and a cuisine prepared by one of Korea's top celebrity chefs. Western meals are available, but you might want to go native: Hanu Ansim (Korean beef tenderloin), Yang Galbi (lamb chops, Korean-style steak) or the local seafood?

See cgv.co.kr

9. CINEMA DEI PICCOLI, ROME, ITALY

Rome – home of Fellini – has fabulous arthouse cinemas, including Casa del Cinema and Nuovo Sacher. 

But for sheer oddity and charm, it's hard to go past the Cinecitta dei Piccoli, the world's smallest picture house.

Just a healthy stroll across the Villa Borghese Park from Via Venetto – the heart of Fellini's La Dolce Vita – this dollhouse of a cinema is still flourishing eight decades after it opened in 1934.

Originally designed to show comedies and cartoons for children, it still caters for children in the afternoon. But at night it turns into an adult cine-club. See cinemadeipiccoli.it

10. CINETECA MATADERO, MADRID, SPAIN

How many cinemas do you know that began life as an abattoir? 

Since the 1990s, Madrid's old slaughterhouse and meat market district has become home to various arts organisations, including Spain's National Ballet and National Dance Company. 

But the Cineteca Matadero is the most beautiful conversion. The light-filled building is dedicated to Spanish film-making, including a cinema, exhibition space, documentary facilities and a film archive. It's all very "vangardista" (the Spanish equivalent of the French avant-garde).

But even if you don't watch a movie, it's worth having lunch at the building's Cantina to admire the architecture. See mataderomadrid.org

Steve Meacham was a guest of North West Tourism, WA.

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