Andy Campbell at Shipstern Bluff.

Southern breaks

Armed with surfboard and wetsuit, Sam Vincent surveys the island state’s perfect waves.

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Walk on the mild side

On a milestone birthday, Jo Chandler fast-tracks her spiritual communion with nature at the Bay of Fires.

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Memorable colours ... lichen on shore rocks at the Bay of Fires.

A little bay of sunshine

Kerry van der Jagt revels in the natural wonders of the hottest holiday spot of the year.

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Boats moored in the bay at St Helens

St Helens

St Helens (including Georges Bay)
Largest town and holiday destination on Tasmania's East Coast
St Helens is a substantial seaside town located 166 km (via Scottsdale) east of Launceston and 36 km north of St Marys. It is the largest town on the Tasmanian East Coast. Its economy is dependent on fishing, timber and tourism. And, when it comes to tourism, the town prides itself in its warmth and sunniness - the result of a microclimate produced by surrounding hills and warm ocean currents. Consequently St Helens is warmer than Melbourne in winter and enjoys an average of 22°C in February.

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St Helens - Fast Facts

St Helens (including Georges Bay)
Largest town and holiday destination on Tasmania's East Coast
St Helens is a substantial seaside town located 166 km (via Scottsdale) east of Launceston and 36 km north of St Marys. It is the largest town on the Tasmanian East Coast. Its economy is dependent on fishing, timber and tourism. And, when it comes to tourism, the town prides itself in its warmth and sunniness - the result of a microclimate produced by surrounding hills and warm ocean currents. Consequently St Helens is warmer than Melbourne in winter and enjoys an average of 22°C in February.

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St Helens - Sleep

St Helens (including Georges Bay)
Largest town and holiday destination on Tasmania's East Coast
St Helens is a substantial seaside town located 166 km (via Scottsdale) east of Launceston and 36 km north of St Marys. It is the largest town on the Tasmanian East Coast. Its economy is dependent on fishing, timber and tourism. And, when it comes to tourism, the town prides itself in its warmth and sunniness - the result of a microclimate produced by surrounding hills and warm ocean currents. Consequently St Helens is warmer than Melbourne in winter and enjoys an average of 22°C in February.

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